SEARCH
SUGGESTIONSClose
{{term.text}}
PRODUCTSView Results
{{prd._source.name}} {{prd._source.displayName}} {{prd._source.displayName}}
by {{prd._source.brand}}
{{prd._source.sKU}}
{{prd._source.definitionName | productType}}
Not Yet Rated
Search Options
Would you like to search using your current filters below?
  • {{value}}
Yes   No

Binding Small Embroidery Projects

(Click to View All Images)


Materials
  • Fabric strips:
  • 2 ½” width by the length needed to go around your project for projects with a ½” seam allowance.
  • 2 ¼” width by the length needed to go around your project for projects with a ¼” seam allowance.
  • Magic Sizing® or Spray Starch
  • Sewing machine thread to match the binding strip
  • Bobbin thread to match the back of the project
  • Craft Clips or Quilt Pins
  • Thingamajig®
  • ¼” presser foot
  • Standard presser foot
  • Small scissors


  • Final Product: What You Will Create

    Preface:
    We usually end quilted projects with the phrase “bind as desired.” Since we are demonstrating embroidery projects I realized that you may be embroiderers and not quilters and that you don’t have a preferred method for attaching binding to these embroidery projects. Most of the tutorials shown on the internet have complicated methods for joining the binding at the beginning of the end of the project. On small embroidered projects there simply is not enough room to use those techniques. Therefore, I thought I would demonstrate for you here how I apply the binding to these small projects with a simplified method to complete the beginning and ending of the binding.


    Step 1:
    It is handy to have these things available when you are binding a project though it is not essential to have them all.
    A standard presser foot;
    A ¼” presser foot;
    A Thingamajig (the purple thing in the photo);
    Wonder or Craft clips or quilting pins;
    And of course small scissors to clip threads.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    For the mug mats shown in this demonstration a ½” seam allowance was left around the project to get it up to a mug mat size. When a ½” seam allowance is used I cut a strip of fabric 2 ½” wide across the width of the fabric. This strip is cut straight across the fabric and not on the bias as we are not going around any curves. If you were instructed to leave a ¼” seam allowance around a mini quilt or other project cut the strip of fabric 2 ¼” wide. Place the strip of fabric on a cutting board. Lay the 45 degree line on a quilting ruler along the long edge of the strip. The binding fabric is wrong side up. Trim the top of the strip at a 45 degree angle with the high point of the angle on the right.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 3:
    Spray the whole strip with Magic Sizing®, fold the fabric down ¼” on the angled edge and press.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together, and press the length of the strip.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    Clip off the little dog ear that is on the pointed end of the binding so that you are working with a straight edge.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    If you have a feature on your sewing machine that will make the needle always stop with the needle in the down position, set that feature to on. Use a thread that matches your binding in the top of the machine and a bobbin that matches the back of the quilt or the quilting. Clip the raw edges of the binding to the mug mat on the bottom of mug mat and about 2 ½” from the side edge of the mug mat. Start sewing about 2” down from the top point of the binding; approximately just under where the blue clip is shown holding the binding. Stitch with 1/4” seam allowance. ¼” presser foot as a guide.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 7:
    Stop sewing when you are ¼” above the bottom edge of the mug mat with the needle in the down position.


    Step 8:
    Pivot the mug mat and stitch off the corner at a 45 degree angle.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    Your first row of stitches will look like this. Your top thread will match your binding, a contrasting thread has been used in the photos to make it easier for you to see it.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    Fold the binding straight back to the right side, which will form a 45 degree angle on the inside; finger press that angled fold.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 11:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Fold the binding down the edge side of the mug mat having the top of the fold even with the bottom edge of the mat and over the 1st angled fold. Align the binding with the side edge of the mat.


    Step 12:
    Stitch from the very top of the mat to ¼” from the bottom edge, stop with the needle down, pivot the mat and stitch off the corner again at a 45 degree angle as shown.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 13:
    Repeat Steps 10, 11 and 12 twice to stitch the binding to 3 sides of the mat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 14:
    Repeat Steps 10 and 11 to form the 4th corner, but only stitch down from the top of the mat about 1 ½”, back stitch and then cut the threads.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 15:
    Place a pin ¼” from the inside folded edge of the beginning of the binding.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 16:
    Lay the free end of your binding along the edge of the quilt, fold the bottom edge to form a 45 degree angle that ends just below the pin.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 17:
    Trim the end of the binding at that 45 degree angle.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 18:
    Tuck the end of the binding inside the 1st binding that was laid on the mat, making sure the overlap is smooth and that the beginning and ending binding strips are aligned with the edge of the mat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 19:
    Complete the stitching on the bottom of the mat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 20:
    Trim the thread ends from the corners and from where you started and stopped the stitching.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 21:
    Turn the binding to the right side of the quilt.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 22:
    Pull the binding over the top center of the mat and clip in place; pull the binding over the right side of the mat and clip into place. Having these two points in place makes it easier to miter the corner.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 23:
    Tuck the side binding under the top binding to form the mitered corner; hold with a clip.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 24:
    Rotate the mat to the left; pull the binding over the bottom of the mat and clip; tuck the bottom binding under the top binding to miter the corner. The Thingamajig® is a useful tool to make sure the binding is evenly tucked under the upper binding to form nice corners. Continue rotating to the left and mitering the corners around the mat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 25:
    You may use any stitch you like to stitch down the binding, a straight stitch or decorative stitch. I choose to use an E stitch, sometimes called a blanket stitch. If you choose a decorative stitch be sure to change to a standard presser foot at this point.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 26:
    Select your stitch, in this case I used an E stitch. Mirror the stitch so that the bite the stitch takes is to the right if necessary. I adjust the stitch length to 3 mm to make the stitch a little wider.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 27:
    Position the presser foot on the binding and mat so that the needle will fall just over the top of the binding.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 28:
    Stitch right into the corners and pivot to continue around the mat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 29:
    Backstitch over the beginning stitches to secure your thread. When the top thread matches your binding strip it will not be as obvious as it is here with the contrasting thread. You may whip stitch the corners if necessary if you feel any are too loose, but I have never found it necessary to do so. Press your project and it is complete.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)


    For the love of embroidery…
    Pat Williams


    Share this project:     
    Meet The Author: Pat Williams
    Award winning Digitizer, Embroidery Educator, Author and a Consultant to the Industry, Pat Williams has 20 years of experience in the embroidery industry. Pat has won multiple awards for her digitizing expertise including the 2007 Impressions Awards Grand Championship, Best of Show as well as the 1st and 2nd Place Awards.. Pat’s love of digitizing has afforded her the opportunity to write many articles for Impressions magazine in the United States and Images Magazine in Europe. She also has authored her own digitizing training CD series, “Digitizing Steps to Success.” In 2001 Pat was named “Embroidery Educator of the Year.” For many years Pat lead digitizing seminars at the ISS Shows in Long Beach, CA and for Compucon software. Pat retired from the commercial embroidery arena in 2010. She now resides in Sierra Vista, AZ. She can be reached at pwilliams22@cox.net.

    Feedback
    Rate this Project: Awful Poor Average Good Excellent    Not Yet Rated
    | |
    Sheila M Feb 23, 2019
    Great tutorial!
    Reply
    SHOPPING CART
    Contains 0 Item
    RECEIVE SPECIALS AT...
    Sign Up
    Scroll to Top Image
    New Message Alert
    New Message(s)
    Your custom digitizing order(s) has 1 new message(s) waiting for you. Please read immediately and respond to expedite the processing of your order(s).
    Read Message Now
    CLOSE