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ITH Crazy Quilt Blocks Table Runner

(Click to View All Images)


Materials
  • 6”x6”, 6”x10” or larger hoop
  • ¼ yard of 10 different fabrics for the table runner top.
  • Or fabric scraps totaling about 2 ½ yards
  • ½ yard of backing fabric cut into 10 8” squares
  • Neutral thread for all piecing
  • Water Soluble Thread
  • Standard sewing machine
  • A walking foot is helpful when joining and binding the runner
  • 8 to 10 colors of embroidery thread to coordinate with your materials. Due to the small amount of stitches in the embroidery lace effects this is a good time to use all those little amounts of embroidery thread left on your spools.
  • 1 yard of Battilizer or low loft quilt batting cut into 10 8” squares
  • Poly-mesh or no-show stabilizer for 10 hoopings
  • Spray adhesive
  • Scotch Tape

  • Designs used in this project

    Preface:
    There are 8 separate crazy quilt square designs. Each square can be rotated four different ways within your table topper or quilt. You can also bypass the embroidered flower or butterfly within each of the 8 designs. Use them however you like for endless variety within your table runner. In each of these designs an outline will sew to give you an idea of the general placement of each fabric. After the general outline sews one more outline will sew for the first fabric placement. You place that fabric right side up over that outline. All subsequent fabrics will be placed wrong side up over previously placed fabric. The design will stitch a seam line to secure that fabric. You will then flip that fabric into its position. The design will then stitch a tack down line if necessary to guide you as to where to trim the fabric.
     
    The proper use of scotch tape when required is essential to the success of sewing these designs. Please be sure to follow the instructions for doing this. If you don’t your fabric dog-ears will get caught in your presser foot and could create serious issues with your machine. I think an article covering the completion of each of these quilt blocks is unnecessary and would be redundant. However we will cover one of the blocks step by step, and then the others will not be a problem. The fabric stops for the outlining and piecing of the block can all be sewn with one neutral color. Grey thread tends to blend into many fabrics nicely.


    Step 1:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 1.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 2.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 3:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 3.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 4.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 5.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 6.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 7:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 7.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 8:
    This is the sewing sequence for Block 8.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    Hoop a piece of poly mesh stabilizer in your 6”x6” or larger hoop.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    With Neutral thread stitch the 1st color sequence which is an outline for your block. Use the neutral thread for all color stops until you reach the point where a design is sewn on block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 11:
    Remove the hoop from the machine and spray lightly with adhesive spray. Place an 8” square of Battilizer® over the stitched outline. Make sure the batting exceeds the outline by ½” on all sides.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 12:
    Return the hoop to the machine and stitch the next color sequence which will outline the fabric placements in the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 13:
    Run the next color sequence which will outline the 1st fabric placement. This will be a different starting point in each of the quilt blocks. Remove the hoop from the machine and spray the whole block with adhesive spray. Using adhesive spray will allow each of the pieces to be tacked to the block without having to iron each fabric as you proceed through the block.


    Step 14:
    Place your first piece of fabric right side up over the outline just sewn. For this particular piece and for all pieces that rest on the outside edges of the blocks make sure that the fabric extends ½” beyond the edges of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 15:
    Stitch the next color sequence which will tack down the first fabric on the inside of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 16:
    Trim the fabric to approximately ¼” from the tack down stitches. Do not trim the excess fabric that extends on the outside edges of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 17:
    Place your 2nd fabric face down over the 1st fabric aligning the edge of the fabric with the ¼” seam allowance you just trimmed. Where the fabric reaches the outside edge of the block make sure that it exceeds the outside edge by ½”.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 18:
    Run the next color stop which will be a seam line for fabrics 1 and 2.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 19:
    Flip fabric 2 over and finger press the seam line. Smooth the fabric over the batting.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 20:
    Run the next color stop which will be a tack down line for the 2nd fabric.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 21:
    Trim the fabric exceeding the tack down line to ¼”. I didn’t leave the ½” extension into the border on this block as the fabric for the block below it will make up the outside border edges.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 22:
    Place the 3rd fabric face down over fabrics 1 and 2 aligning the edge of the fabric with the trimmed seam allowances. Make sure the fabric will extend ½” beyond the block outline at the top of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 23:
    Run the next color stop which will seam fabric 3 to fabrics 1 and 2.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 24:
    Flip fabric 3 to the right side and run the next color stop which will tack down fabric 3.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 25:
    Trim the seam allowance to ¼”.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 26:
    Place fabric 4 face down over fabric 3.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 27:
    Run the next color stop which will be the seam line; flip and smooth down the fabric and run the next color stop which will be the tack down stitch. Trim the fabric along the tack down stitch.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 28:
    Continue on in this manner of placing fabric; running the seam line; flipping and smoothing the fabric; running the tack down stitches. Note on some fabric sections there will be two tack down stitches such as in this picture from the second block. The two lines of tack down stitches will be on the same color stop. After these stitches sew you would trim both the top and bottom edges to ¼”, leaving the outside edge extending beyond the block outline intact.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 29:
    IMPORTANT: When the entire block is covered with fabric we need to place scotch tape over all the areas where the un-sewn fabrics cross over each other. This is very important as if you miss this step the fabrics will flip up and get caught in the embroidery presser foot when you sew the block tack down for the quilt sandwich back fabric. Place the scotch tape right up to and even over the seam lines a little wherever two fabrics meet that are not stitched down.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 30:
    Before we put the back of the quilt block on the embroidery design will sew on the block. The color chart for the particular block you are stitching will start listing actual color names and numbers at this point in the color sequence instead of just saying neutral thread. There is one to three colors in these simple embroideries. Of course you can use whatever colors you choose, but by naming colors at this point in the color chart you know that is when the embroidery is going to take place. On a side note, if you do not want a design embroidered on any particular block, you can just forward through the colors stops at this point on your embroidery machine.


    Step 31:
    After the embroidery design takes place put water soluble thread into the top of the machine. Remove the hoop from the machine; do not unhoop; turn the hoop over and spray the back of the block with adhesive spray; spread your back fabric over the block making sure all edges exceed the outline by ½”.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 32:
    Run the next color sequence in the water soluble thread to tack the back fabric to the quilt block. Water soluble thread is used so that when you join the complete blocks together, and maybe don’t stitch them exactly on the sewn line, the water soluble thread will wash away and your table runner or quilt will look much neater.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 33:
    Select 8 or more colors of embroidery thread to stitch the embroidery stitches that will run over all the edges where two fabrics join.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 34:
    Run the embroidery designs over the edges changing colors to whatever suits you at each color stop. For a neater back you could change the bobbin to match the various colors, but as I didn’t intend for this to be reversible table runner I left white thread in the bobbin. You embroidery will be neater on the back regardless if you bring the bobbin thread to the top as you start each section.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 35:
    Remove the block from the hoop. Lay the ½” mark of the ruler along the water soluble tack down line and trim the excess fabric from the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 36:
    This is what your completed trimmed block will look like. Make 9 more blocks for this table runner.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 37:
    Plan your layout of the blocks as their placement within the table runner will determine how they are to be trimmed to complete the runner.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 38:
    To reduce bulk in the seams you will want to trim the batting from between the seams on all the edges where the blocks will be sewn together. You will want to leave the batting between the seams on all edges that will be on the outside of the runner to support the binding when it is applied. To remove the batting on the joining edges fold back the seam allowance fabric on the front.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 39:
    Fold back the seam allowance fabric on the back of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 40:
    With small sharp scissors trim the batting out up right next to the seam line.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 41:
    The lower left hand corner block of the runner would have the batting removed as in this picture. The top edge has the batting removed as it will join the next block up. The right and left edges are left with the batting intact to support the binding when it is applied to the runner.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 42:
    The lower right hand corner block will have the batting trimmed out of the top and left side edges.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 43:
    The blocks other than the top two and the bottom two will be trimmed on three sides. Only the side that will be on the edge of the runner will have the batting left intact.


    Step 44:
    The blocks are sewn together on your regular sewing machine. Using the double pinning method described here will help ensure your blocks are aligned correctly. Place a pin vertically through the corner of the water soluble outline of the first block. Stick the pin through to the corner of the water soluble outline of the second block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 45:
    Take a 2nd straight pin and pin horizontally through all layers.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 46:
    Repeat the two pins method at the other corner of the block and in the center. Remove the vertical pins.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 47:
    Stitch the two blocks together on your regular sewing machine with neutral sewing thread just a thread widths inside the water soluble thread stitching.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 48:
    Using as much steam as your iron can generate, press the seam flat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 49:
    Still using lots of steam, press the seam open.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 50:
    Still using the maximum steam – turn the blocks over and steam press over the seam again.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 51:
    Working down your table runner join two blocks together to form 5 rows of blocks.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 52:
    Choose a fabric for the sashing on the back of your table runner. Cut a strip 1.75” wide.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 53:
    Fold each unit of 2 quilt blocks right sides together and trim that inside seam to 3/8”.


    Step 54:
    Fold the sashing strip’s long sides in to meet in the middle and press.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 55:
    Center the sashing strip over the seam line of the two block unit. Extend the end of the strip just barely over the water soluble thread outline on the blocks.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 56:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Load Invisible thread in the top and bobbin of your regular sewing machine.


    Step 57:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Choose a stitch that is not a straight such as this Serpentine stitch on your machine.


    Step 58:
    Stitch down each side of the sashing. The use of the serpentine stitch and invisible thread will keep these seams from being obvious on the front of your quilt blocks.


    Step 59:
    Trim off the end of the sashing strip just beyond the water soluble outline on the far end of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 60:
    Apply the sashing to all the units of two blocks.


    Step 61:
    Join the 5 units or two blocks to each other using the same pinning techniques as described above. Be sure to keep the units with the batting still intact on the proper edges of the runner so that they will support the quilt binding.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 62:
    Press all seams flat and then open as previously described. The back of the runner will now look like this.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 63:
    Trim the seams to 3/8th” and apply sashing over the seams covering from one side of the runner to the other.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 64:
    The table runner top will now look like this.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 65:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Apply binding using your favorite method or see our free article on “Binding an In The Hoop Quilt Block" project. Congratulations your table runner is finished! You can use the same techniques to make a wall hanging or lap quilt of any size!

    For the love of embroidery. . .
    Pat Williams


    Share this project:     
    Meet The Author: Pat Williams
    Award winning Digitizer, Embroidery Educator, Author and a Consultant to the Industry, Pat Williams has 20 years of experience in the embroidery industry. Pat has won multiple awards for her digitizing expertise including the 2007 Impressions Awards Grand Championship, Best of Show as well as the 1st and 2nd Place Awards.. Pat’s love of digitizing has afforded her the opportunity to write many articles for Impressions magazine in the United States and Images Magazine in Europe. She also has authored her own digitizing training CD series, “Digitizing Steps to Success.” In 2001 Pat was named “Embroidery Educator of the Year.” For many years Pat lead digitizing seminars at the ISS Shows in Long Beach, CA and for Compucon software. Pat retired from the commercial embroidery arena in 2010. She now resides in Sierra Vista, AZ. She can be reached at pwilliams22@cox.net.

    Feedback
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    Delores J Aug 02, 2014
    I gotta have these but I need it in pes I do have the real large hoop but need pes format please. Thanks os pretty.
    Reply
    Pat W Aug 06, 2014
    The ITH Crazy Quilt Blocks are all available in PES format.
    Reply

    rose c Aug 03, 2014
    Want the crazy quilt runner, all blocks for one price. Thank you
    Reply
    Pat W Aug 06, 2014
    A Design Pack for the ITH Crazy Quilt Blocks should be posted by Monday, August 11, 2014. Thank you for your patience. The individual designs have to all be posted before we can make the Design Pack. You should be able to access it from this project page.
    Reply
    rose c Aug 07, 2014
    Thank you I am so delighted with this design can't wait to make one.
    Reply
    Pat W Aug 11, 2014
    The design pack is now available at this link http://www.embroiderydesigns.com/productdetails/Pat-Williams/DesignPack/1/DPCRAZQB.aspx I will also ask the website to link it to this project page. Thanks
    Reply
    rose c Aug 14, 2014
    Thank you I now have the crazy quilt runner. Now I can start on it.
    Reply

    rose c Aug 14, 2014
    Thank you I now have the crazy quilt runner. Now I can start on it.
    Reply

    rose c Aug 04, 2014
    Want this pattern in pes also just love the crazy quilt design.
    Reply

    sheena c Jan 19, 2016
    This is amazing!!! My machine only does 4x4, do you have anything like this for that size hoop?
    Reply