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ITH Mylar Easter Egg Dresden Plate

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Materials
  • 5” x 7” hoop
  • 22 pieces 6” x 8” white Kona cotton fabric
  • 11 pieces 6” x 8” Pellon 988 batting
  • Purley Gates iridescent mylar
  • Embroidery thread as stated in color sequence
  • 5 pieces medium weight cutaway to fit hoop
  • 22 pieces 6” x 8” fibrous water-soluble stabilizer (WSS)
  • KK2000 Temporary spray adhesive
  • Small applique scissors
  • Sponge brush and tray of water
  • Painter’s tape

  • Designs used in this project

    Final Product: What You Will Create

    Preface:
    This project is actually easy to do because it is repetitious embroidery. Each Dresden fan is done in the hoop, stitching the egg first, then re-hooping and stitching the blade placement lines. The embroidered egg is then added and satin stitched down. Completing each blade is adding the backing and quilting—all in the hoop! Every other blade is stitched without an egg, though blades with eggs could be done for each blade. The center circle is embroidered last, which includes the text and quilting. Assembly is done quickly at the sewing machine, using the embroidery thread to make a beautiful 17.5” Dresden plate mat to decorate your home.


    Step 1:
    Read through the instructions thoroughly before beginning and assemble all the materials needed to complete the project. Five egg blades and five quilting only blades, along with a center, make up the Dresden plate mat. The stitching is low density over the mylar, so it sparkles so pretty in each egg. Follow the stitching sequence for each blade. What is shown in these instructions is one decorative egg blade and one quilting blade, along with the center and assembly. The egg blades are all done in the same manner, it is just the decorative stitching on the egg that varies. Stitch one of each egg blade and five of each quilted blade, and one center.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    For each egg blade, hoop one layer of medium weight cutaway stabilizer with one layer of white Kona cotton. Stitch color 1, the placement line. Cut a piece of Mylar larger than the placement line and place down over the stitching. Stitch color 2 which will tack down the Mylar.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 3:
    Now stitch following the color sequence. The low-density fill will stitch and then the decorations for the egg. After the egg has finished stitching, remove the excess Mylar.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    Remove the fabric from the hoop and cut around the outside of the egg, leaving about ¼” all around for a seam allowance, which will be trimmed after the egg is tacked down to the blade. Set the egg design aside until needed.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    Next will be to stitch placement and outlines for the blade. Hoop two layers of fibrous water-soluble stabilizer. Place one layer of Pellon 988 batting over the WSS. Place the hoop on the machine and stitch the blade outline.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    Place one piece of white Kona cotton over the batting and stitch the blade and egg outlines. Lightly spray the back of the egg that was set aside with the spray adhesive.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 7:
    This is the critical part of the project. Very carefully align the egg over the egg outline on the blade. The outer stitching line of the egg will align over the outline, and the seam allowance will extend beyond that. If the egg is not aligned correctly at this point, the satin stitching will be off. Slow the machine way down for this step. Stitch the next color, stopping and readjusting the egg if necessary, to tack down the egg to the blade. If at this point the egg is off, just carefully remove this tack down and back up the stitching and try again. After the egg is tacked down, use the small applique scissors to trim the seam allowance on the egg close to the tack down stitching.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 8:
    Next, place on the appropriate thread color and stitch the satin edging around the egg. Just a note: the reason the egg was not stitched directly onto the blade, is after testing, the registration was off and it was determined this was the best method of doing these blades.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    Use the KK200 to spray the back side of another piece of Kona cotton and place it on the back side of the hoop. The next color to stitch will tack this to the top fabric and batting.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    Continue stitching the quilting. After the quilting stitches, remove the hoop from the machine, turn it over, and trim away the excess fabric from around the blade; be very careful not to cut into the WSS.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 11:
    Turn the hoop to the right side and trim away the top fabric from around the blade, and then the batting. Again, be very careful not to cut into the WSS. The trimming should be done in layers (trust me, it’s easier!) and very close to the blade outline on both the top and bottom.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 12:
    Place the hoop back on the machine and stitch the satin stitch outline. This completes the decorative egg blade stitching. 

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 13:
    Trim away the excess WSS being very careful not to cut into any of the satin stitching. Set this blade aside. 

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 14:
    Now load and stitch the remaining blades with eggs following the steps and color sequence.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 15:
    After all the egg blades are completed, then stitch five quilting blades. It’s basically the same steps except for the egg. Hoop two layers of WSS. Spray and place a piece of Kona cotton on the back of the hoop, and place down the batting and a piece of white Kona cotton on the front of the hoop. Stitch the outline, and the quilting. 

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 16:
    Trim away the excess fabric close to the blade outline on the back and front, and then trim the batting; stitch the satin outline.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 17:
    Trim the excess WSS from around the blade. Each quilting blade will go between two decorative egg blades.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 18:
    The final thing to stitch before assembly is the center piece. Place the design on the machine. Hoop two layers of WSS. Place down a piece of batting and then a piece of Kona cotton on top. Stitch the circle outline.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 19:
    Next the text will stitch. After the text stitches, then spray and place a piece of Kona cotton on the back of the hoop. Place the hoop on the machine and stitch the tackdown and quilting. Do use white thread for doing these as the colored thread may show under the final satin stitching (ask me how I know!) Trim away the excess back fabric close to the outline.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 20:
    Trim away the excess fabric and batting close to the outline. Place the hoop back on the machine and stitch the satin outline. Remove the piece from the hoop and trim away the excess stabilizer.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 21:
    After all the pieces are stitched and trimmed, use a dampened sponge brush to dissolve away the remaining stabilizer from around the edges of all the pieces. It doesn’t take much water, so use the water sparingly. Let all the pieces dry.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 22:
    Now comes the assembly. White embroidery thread is used for all the assembly. Use the sewing machine and choose a stitch for joining the blades together. I chose this ladder stitch with a width of 4mm and spacing of 3mm. However, a zig-zag or 3-step zig zag or other stitch could be used—use a stitch that will catch both edges to join the pieces. Lay the pieces out in pairs, to join one quilting blade to one egg blade.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 23:
    Butt, but do not push, the blades together. Sew from the lower edge of the blade to the top, using the stitch chosen. Check that these pieces lay flat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 24:
    After the pairs are joined, then stitch and join two pairs together. Check that these pieces lay flat.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 25:
    After those are joined, then stitch and join the remaining sections. The Dresden blades should lay flat. If they don’t, then figure out what blades are not close enough or too close, removing the stitching and re-stitching. Hopefully you won’t have to do this because the removal of the stitching might mess up the satin outlines. 

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 26:
    Center the circle piece over the inner blade edges—it should cover those edges by about 1/8”.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 27:
    Flip the piece over to make sure all the interior edges are covered by the circle piece. Flip it back to the front and use painter’s tape to temporarily hold the circle piece in place. 

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 28:
    Choose a stitch to secure the circle to the blades. I chose a blanket stitch with 3mm spacing and 4mm bite. Sew carefully around the circle, removing the tape when necessary and keeping the outer swing of the needle right at the edge of the circle.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 29:
    To make sure the bottom edges are secure, use the button sewing stitch on the machine to create a tack at the bottom of each of the blade sections as shown.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 30:
    Creating the beautiful mat does take a bit of time, but the stitching really does go quite fast because it is repetitious, and the Mylar creates such a nice sparkle under the eggs.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 31:
    Here is something else you can do: stitch several of the center circle pieces and use them as coasters to go along with the mat!

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 32:
    Congratulations! You will enjoy this ITH Mylar Easter Egg Dresden Plate year after year. You probably will enjoy making it so much you’ll want to make more for other family members and friends.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



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    Meet The Author: Ramona Baird
    Ramona Baird has been in the embroidery industry for over 23 years. She and her husband owned a commercial and retail embroidery store in Arizona for many years. She is an experienced digitizer having been mentored by award-winners Pat Williams and Lindee Goodall. Ramona is a contributor to “Creative Machine Embroidery” magazine having 5 covers to her credit. Ramona has worked for Wilcom America and served many years as Education Director for the American Sewing Guild. With a degree in fashion design, she is able to design and execute patterns which Pat Williams says are “out of the box” in creativity and application. Ramona likes to challenge the boundaries of embroidery and bring new and exciting designs, ideas, and projects to EmbroideryDesigns.com. She wants embroiderers of all levels to increase their skills and enjoyment in using their embroidery machine for gift-making and personal pleasure.

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