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Quarter Log Cabin Lap Quilt

(Click to View All Images)


Materials
  • 8” x 8” embroidery hoop or larger
  • ¼” yard of Red quilting cotton for the squares
  • 2 ½ yards of Red quilting cotton for sashing, borders and binding.
  • 20 10” squares from quilting cotton stash or all of the same color for block backs
  • Stash of fabrics equaling about 2.5 yards of fabric cut into 2.5”strips. Combine light, medium and dark fabrics. You will need about 80 10” strips.
  • Mountain Mist® Twin Size Polyester Quilt-Light batting
  • 9 yards of fibrous water soluble stabilizer such as Wet N’ Gone® for 8” x8” hoops or more if a larger hoop is used
  • Water soluble thread
  • Invisible thread
  • Spray Adhesive
  • 18mm Bias Tape Maker (optional)
  • Elmer’s washable glue sticks (about 4 of them in they are small)
  • Or Elmer’s liquid washable glue

  • Designs used in this project

    Final Product: What You Will Create

    Preface:
    I’m assuming that all of you have fabric stash that you would like to see used up. The lap quilt shown in the sample happens to use all Christmas themed fabrics as that is what I wanted to use up. This quilt can be made with any fabrics that you desire. Do use a mixture of light, medium and dark fabrics for contrast. Most of the quilts that I make are table runners and wall hangings, which do not require a lot of loft. I wanted this lap quilt to be snuggly and soft. By using the polyester batting, which was also in my stash, and fibrous water soluble stabilizer, which would wash away after the quilt was completed, and a nice open quilting pattern, the mission was accomplished. A nice soft lap quilt with loft.


    Step 1:
    Pull an assortment of fabrics from your fabric stash to cut into strips for your quilt. Note I only needed to use about a quarter of the fabrics shown here.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    From your larger pieces of various fabrics cut 20 10” squares for the block backs and 20 10” squares of the quilt batting. See the tip for cutting the batting in the next step. Cut 20 2.5” squares of red cotton if you want to keep the corner squares consistent. Cut the stash fabrics into 2.5” strips. It is impossible to tell you exactly how many strips to cut as you will most likely be cutting some from odd lengths of material, however you will need about eighty 10” strips. I recommend that you just cut a variety of fabrics and add more later if you need to.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 3:
    When you open the batting from the package unroll the batting lengthwise but leave the widthwise folds. Measure off a 10” strip and cut across with ruler. Then open up that strip and cut into 10” sections. The 10” squares do not have to be perfect as they are cut larger than needed to cover the back of the block and will be trimmed off later.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    Take one back square, one batting square, one 2.4” red square and three colors of fabrics for the quilt block to the embroidery machine. Hoop one layer of fibrous water soluble stabilizer in your hoop. Run CS 1 (color stop) on the stabilizer to stitch the placement lines in a neutral thread.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    Remove the hoop from the machine, do not unhoop. Spray adhesive on the stabilizer covering the whole embroidery area. Place the top and left side of the corner square, right side up if you are using a print, along the 1st placement lines. The bottom and right sides of the red square will exceed the outside edge placement lines.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    Cut a 2 ½” square from the fabric you want to make the first fabric strips around the red square. Place that fabric right side down directly on top of the red square (do not spray with adhesive). Run CS 2 which will seam the two fabrics together.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 7:
    Open up the top fabric and smooth it tightly against the stabilizer towards the top of the hoop.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 8:
    Align the strip of fabric that matches your print square on top of the two stitched squares right side down. Run CS 3 to seam that strip to the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    Flip up the extra fabric you have in that lengthwise strip and trim it off about ½” below the bottom of the seam.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    Unfold the strip and finger press over the stabilizer.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 11:
    Align your fabric strip choice for the next strip over the top edge of the existing strips and run CS 4 to stitch it down.  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 12:
    Fold the excess fabric back and trim evenly with the existing strips.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 13:
    Finger press the fabric strip towards the top of the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 14:
    Align a second strip of the same fabric along the side edges of the existing blocks and run CS 5 to stitch it in place.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 15:
    Flip out the strip and finger press towards the next placement line. Due to variances in cutting and the thickness of the fabric the strip may not exactly reach the next placement line. As long as you are within 1/8” of the placement line the block will be just fine. Use the placement line itself to align the next strip of fabric.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 16:
    Repeat Steps 11 through 15 using CS 6 &7 to add the final two strips to the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 17:
    At the bottom edges of the block there will be unstitched folds the fabric in the extra ½” strips that extend beyond the lower placement line. Using small bits of cellophane tape, tape these edges down so they don’t get caught by the presser foot in the next step.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 18:
    Remove the hoop from the machine, do not unhoop. Spray adhesive on the batting and position it over the block on the back of the hoop. Spray adhesive on the wrong side of your chosen back fabric square and position right side up over the batting.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 19:
    Run CS 8 in water soluble thread to tack down the back batting and fabric to the block. Run CS 9 in Super White thread to quilt the block.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 20:
    Align the ¼” mark of a see through quilters ruler along the water soluble tack down lines and trim the block to this ¼” seam allowance on all sides

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 21:
    Your block will look like this. Make 19 more blocks in the fabrics of your choice keeping only the first red square in a consistent color.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 22:
    Lay out your blocks 4 across and 5 five blocks down in the order you want them to be in your lap quilt. I paid no heed to the colors of the fabrics on the back of the blocks, but if you don’t want any of the squares with matching back fabrics to be next to each other this is the time check that.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 23:
    We will now join 4 blocks together in 5 rows. Choose a wide zigzag stitch on your sewing machine and have it widely spaced so that the zigzag stitches are not too close together.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 24:
    Aligning the tops, butt two blocks up together without overlaps or gaps and zigzag together using the sewing machine thread color of your choice. Add two more blocks to the row in the same manner. Repeat until you have 5 rows of 4 blocks each.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 25:
    Trim any slight variances on both long edges of the row of blocks.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 26:
    Align the rows and join with the same zigzag technique.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 27:
    From the red fabric cut across the width of the fabric:
    a. 8 4” strips for the borders
    b. 11 1 ½” strips for the front sashing
    c. 11 1 ¼” strips for the back sashing
    d. 5 2 ¼” strips for the binding
    e. From the batting cut 4 4” strips for the borders


    Step 28:
    Keep the wide and narrow sashing strips separate throughout the rest of the steps. The narrow strips will go on the back of the lap quilt, the wider strips will be stitched to the front. The long sides of all of the sashing strips need to be ironed in to meet in the middle of the strips. Spray all of the sashing strips with Magic Sizing or spray starch before ironing. You can use a 18mm bias tape maker on the wider sashing strips or fold them in using the procedure in the next step.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 29:
    Place two straight pins about an inch apart into your ironing board cover, inserting the tip into the cover twice leaving about ¾” of space so that the sashing strips can be inserted under the pins. Cut the tips of your strips into a point. Fold the sides of the strip into the center and press for about 3” in length. With the help of another straight pin feed the tip of the sashing underneath the center of the pins in the ironing board. Feed the strip underneath the pins which will help fold the sides of the strip in and press 3 or 4 inches at a time.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 30:
    To help keep the sashing straight we are going to glue them to the quilt before stitching. We are going to apply sashing across the horizontal seams on the back of the quilt first. Run the glue stick down the zigzag stitches across a horizontal seam.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 31:
    Lay a narrow sashing strip, having the top edge of the strip extending about ½” above the edge of the quilt, down the length of the quilt. Measure the side of the sashing to the edge of the quilt in several places to make sure your sashing is straight. The sashing should be about 7 5/8” from the edge of the quilt. Iron across the sashing with an applique iron to keep it in place until you stitch it down.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 32:
    Switch to invisible thread on the top and in the bobbin of your sewing machine. Choose a stitch to sew down both sides of the sashing. I chose the e stitch for this quilt. In retrospect I think I would have been happier with just a straight stitch at a 3mm length. Stitch down both sides of the sashing. Cut off the sashing strip about ½” from the edge of the quilt

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 33:
    Apply the sashing to all of the horizontal seams on the back of the quilt and it will look like this.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 34:
    Turn the quilt over and apply the wider sashing to the horizontal seams gluing and measuring the placement of the seams as before. Stitch down both sides of the sashing strips.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 35:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Return to the back side of the quilt. Glue, place and stitch down the narrow sashing over the vertical seam lines.


    Step 36:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Return to the front of the quilt and stitch the wider sashing strips over the vertical seams using the same techniques.


    Step 37:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Trim the excess sashing strips even with the edges of the quilt on all sides.


    Step 38:
    Make 4 quilt sandwiches from your border strips and batting by spraying one of the fabric strips with adhesive and align it over the batting strip. Turn that unit over and spray adhesive on a second border strip and aligning it over the batting. Do this for all 4 strips.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 39:
    Butt a border strip along the vertical side of the quilt. Stitch the border strip to the quilt with a zigzag stitch like you joined the blocks together. Have the border strip extend beyond the top and bottom of the quilt. Do this on both long sides of the quilt.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 40:
    Trim the ends of the vertical border strips even with the top and bottom of the quilt. Repeat Steps 39 and 40 to attach the top and bottom borders.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 41:
    The sashing strips to apply over the border seams need to be a little longer than those cut across the width of the fabric. To lengthen them take the ends of the sashing strips that you cut off the quilt block sashing matching up four of the narrow sashing strips and four of the wider sashing strips and add those short strips to the full length strips with a slanted seam like you would do for binding strips.   

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 42:
    Apply the narrow sashing to the back of the quilt horizontal seams in the same manner as you applied it to the quilt blocks. Turn the quilt over and apply the sashing to the front horizontal seams with the wider sashing strips.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 43:
    When applying the narrow sashing strips to the back of the quilt over the vertical seams extend the glue and sashing all the way through the top and bottom borders even through the seam doesn’t actually through the borders. Apply the narrow sashing to the back and the wider sashing to the top of the quilt as before. Trim the excess sashing from all edges of the quilt.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 44:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Bind the quilt as desired. Then there is one last step. Throw the quilt in the washer and dryer with a large towel to give it something to agitate with. All of the glue, spray adhesive, fibrous water soluble stabilizer and thread will disappear leaving you with a nice lofty soft quilt. Be sure to inspect the back of the quilt. If any of the water soluble threads were left uncovered in the sewing process the top thread will have dissipated leaving loose bobbin threads on the back. Snip off those bobbin threads.


    Step 45:
    Congratulations you have completed a soft lovely quilt to snuggle under all winter long.

    For the love of embroidery…
    Pat Williams


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    Meet The Author: Pat Williams
    Award winning Digitizer, Embroidery Educator, Author and a Consultant to the Industry, Pat Williams has 20 years of experience in the embroidery industry. Pat has won multiple awards for her digitizing expertise including the 2007 Impressions Awards Grand Championship, Best of Show as well as the 1st and 2nd Place Awards.. Pat’s love of digitizing has afforded her the opportunity to write many articles for Impressions magazine in the United States and Images Magazine in Europe. She also has authored her own digitizing training CD series, “Digitizing Steps to Success.” In 2001 Pat was named “Embroidery Educator of the Year.” For many years Pat lead digitizing seminars at the ISS Shows in Long Beach, CA and for Compucon software. Pat retired from the commercial embroidery arena in 2010. She now resides in Sierra Vista, AZ. She can be reached at pwilliams22@cox.net.

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