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Dish Soap Bottle Apron

(Click to View All Images)


Materials
  • Printed PDF Pattern (download from this project page).
  • 8" x 7½” square lightweight fabric, such as 100% cotton or lightweight denim.
  • Decorative Trim 1½-2”W and 11”L (scalloped edge, eyelet or lace)
  • Seam binding, bias tape or ribbon, 1”W unfolded (or ¼”W pre-folded) and 32”L
  • 1 sheet medium-weight tear-away, sized to completely hoop
  • Optional: 1 sheet Peel “N” Stick stabilizer or 1 sheet tear-away prepared with an adhesive spray

  • Designs used in this project

    Final Product: What You Will Create

    Preface:
    Perk up your kitchen sink with a decorative, washable apron for the dish soap bottle. A quick project, this cute cover-up can be embroidered with a design for specific holidays or choose a design to match your kitchen decor and add a little charm to an everyday chore. It’s also a great stocking stuffer, and it even makes a fun house warming gift when presented on a 25 ounce bottle of dish soap.


    Step 1:
    Gather the materials. This is a great time to make use of those remnants that aren’t quite large enough for other projects and too large to toss. For multiple aprons, you can use a fat quarter and make about 4-8 aprons, depending on how the pattern is set on the fabric. Keep in mind if you pre-cut all the patterns first, or your fabric is too small to completely hoop, you can use the “non-hoop method” with an adhesive stabilizer (explained in Step 3). Binding can be made from remnants, or you can use pre-folded binding or 1”wide ribbon or other trim to cover the edge and create the ties. Any design that fits within an approximate 3”W x 4”H area will work well; the Dish Washing Bear design is 1.30"W x 3.00"H. When choosing your design, be aware of the design size and note that the highest part of the design should not exceed 3”W near the top where the bib of the apron narrows.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    Download the PDF file of the pattern, found on this project page and print. Cut out the pattern along the lines using a craft knife. You can then use the outside piece as a template so that you can see the print of the fabric and determine how it will show on the finished apron, as well as where the design will be embroidered. Mark an outline at the inside edge. This will help judge the center when you hoop the square of fabric for embroidery. (Optional: if you are going to cut multiple aprons from a fat quarter prior to stitching, use the inside pattern piece and trace around it, as it will make it easier to determine the number of aprons and get the most out of the square.)

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 3:
    Embroider the design prior to cutting out the apron to take advantage of the additional fabric that can be hooped, which will also add strength to the foundation during the sewing. If you don’t have enough fabric to hoop completely, or you decide to cut out the apron before the embroidery, you can use the no-hoop method: Hoop one sheet of tear-away stabilizer along with one sheet of Peel “N” Stick on top with the protective sheet facing up (image at left). After the two stabilizers are hooped, use your sewing scissors to snip a bit of the protective sheet to get it started, about an inch away from the hoop, and expose the adhesive by peeling away the protective sheet from the sewing area (image at right). Set the fabric over the top of the exposed adhesive of the Peel “N” Stick and press firmly with the palm of your hand to temporarily adhere the fabric in place. For a little extra assurance, you can pin through the fabric and stabilizers at each fabric edge, away from the sewing area.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    Embroider the design. For the apron made from the Christmas bear print fabric, I set up the lettering for “Beary Christmas!” in my lettering software, using a ½”H font and test-stitched on felt, and then I used the test sample as a placement guide. (If you do not have lettering software, you can use a font on your machine, or the lettering can be set up in the Online Instant Lettering program on EmbroideryDesigns.com. As well, the design file that I made is available to download in Free Designs at EmbroideryDesigns.com.) Hoop the fabric with a sheet of tear-away for backing and then after the embroidery, remove the backing and cut away the excess fabric by following the traced mark as a guide.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    For the denim apron, I stitched the Dish Washing Bear design, using the no-hoop method, as explained in Step 3. Hoop the sheet of tear-away stabilizer along with the sheet of Peel “N” Stick and pin at each side to secure the fabric. (This time, I did not trace the pattern until after the embroidery, because I hadn’t decided yet exactly where I wanted the design to sit on the apron.)

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    Remove the stabilizer. If you have used Peel “N” Stick, then first gently rip away the layer of tear-away stabilizer, and then remove the Peel “N” Stick. If you try to pull both layers of stabilizer off at the same time, it could create enough force to stretch or break any outline stitches. Note, the Peel “N” Stick stabilizer may need to be snipped first to get it started, but it will also rip away as clean as tear-away. If you have waited to cut out the apron until after the embroidery, set the outside pattern piece over the fabric, which will allow you to see and center the design; mark the pattern and cut.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 7:
    Zigzag stitch the raw edges of the apron to discourage fraying. Then attach the trim along the bottom of the apron. I added a 2”W white eyelet trim to the Christmas print apron that is embellished with embroidered bears. The trim I used has a natural gather to it and it’s not necessary to create a gathered edge to attach around a curve. Pin the trim, starting at the center point at the bottom of the apron, and then continue up along each side. (If you are not using a pre-gathered trim, follow the gather instructions in Step 9.) To reduce bulk, trim any excess off each side of the trim to meet with the edge where the final binding will cover. Machine stitch or hand blind stitch the trim to the apron’s bottom edge.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 8:
    For the denim apron I began with an eyelet trim that had been stitched together at one side to a folded strip of gingham print fabric. To create a similar trim, use a 1”W eyelet trim and a 1½”W strip of fabric of the same length; and then with right sides together, serge or stitch a ¼” seam along one side. Open and press along the seam with the seam edge against the wrong side of the gingham fabric. Then fold the fabric edge ¼” to the inside, covering the seam edge. Stitch along the length near the seam, and then press.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    To GATHER: Using a 5 MM stitch length, sew along the length of the gingham fabric (top of the trim) about 1/8” away from the top edge, leaving a long tail at both sides. If you feel it necessary for the fabric you’re using, stitch another line of long stitches parallel about 1/8” away from the first line, leaving long tails. Hold on to the tail of the top thread at one end, and with the other hand, gently push the fabric towards the center; do not force the fabric to slide, using care to prevent breaking the thread or you will lose the gather; repeat this action with the other end. It should then be easy to pin around the bottom edge of the apron and attach to the apron as explained in Step 7.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    Create the binding and ties if you do not have pre-folded binding. Press the outside edges along the length of the 32” strip of fabric or ribbon to the inside to meet at the center, and then fold at center and press along the fold to create a finished binding of about ¼”W. Cut a 2¼” section from one end of the pressed, folded binding and pin this short strip over the edge across the top bib of the apron; machine or hand blind stitch in place. Trim away the excess on each side up to the apron edge. Pin the remaining long piece of binding to the raw edge of the apron: find the center of the binding strip by folding in half, and then pin at each side at the top of the bib about 2” from the center point, leaving a 4” loop that will hook over the top of the bottle neck. Finish attaching the binding over the raw edges on each side to the end point at the apron center, covering the edges of the bottom trim. Machine stitch from one end of the tie, close to the edge, around the neck loop and onto the other side to the other end of the tie.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 11:
    You’re project is now ready to adorn that dish soap bottle!  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



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    Meet The Author: Bonnie Landsberger
    Bonnie Landsberger has been a crafter and hand embroiderer since childhood and a machine embroiderer and digitizer since 1986. She was the in-house head digitizer for a 50-head embroidery shop for 11 years and later offered custom digitizing services and stock design sales through her web site for Moonlight Design since 1993. She currently also holds a position as a customer service representative at EmbroideryDesigns.com. Bonnie has won several awards for digitizing, including a gold medal in the 2002 Digitizing Olympics and grand prize in all categories & first place for Winter Holidays category in the Stitches Magazine Great Greeting Card Contest 2003. Her embroidery and digitizing technical articles can be found in various trade magazines and she is currently a contributing writer and Editorial Advisory Board Member for Stitches Magazine. You can also find more of her articles online at EmbroideryDesigns.com and will continue to contribute articles to our Learning Center.

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    Jill C Dec 21, 2016
    I love this craft! Very Nice.
    Reply

    Shilrley B Feb 16, 2017
    So cute...have to try this.
    Reply
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