SEARCH
SUGGESTIONSClose
{{term.text}}
PRODUCTSView Results
{{prd._source.name}} {{prd._source.displayName}} {{prd._source.displayName}}
by {{prd._source.brand}}
{{prd._source.sKU}}
{{prd._source.definitionName | productType}}
Not Yet Rated
Search Options
Would you like to search using your current filters below?
  • {{value}}
Yes   No

How To Sew An Applique And Sew A Custom Mr. & Mrs. Pillow

(Click to View All Images)


Materials
  • 1/2 to 1 yard Muslin or any nice weight fabric suitable for a pillow. I did double my muslin on each side as it gives the embroidery a nice base to hold the stitches. If you double you will need a yard.
  • Madeira MSA1000 Spray Adhesive (This is just one I really like)
  • Spray Sizing or Spray Starch
  • Tear A Way Stabilizer or cut away. I used cut away on this one due to the size.
  • Sewing thread for machine to match fabric
  • Embroidery thread color of your choice for design
  • Velcro
  • Mr. & Mrs. Design 4.31 x 6.70 or 5.96 x 8.24 size
  • Font used for Mr. & Mrs. is Chancery
  • 16" Pillow Form
  • Heat and Bond Lite

  • Designs used in this project

    Final Product: What You Will Create

    Preface:
    Make this beautiful decorative pillow for your home or to give as a gift. You can make this pillow base in any color, and the embroidery designs allows you to use two colors in the embroidery or match your fabric as a tone on tone and sew in one color. Note: The design DOES NOT come with the name or the date, this is custom and you need to have the ability to add.


    Step 1:
    Cut 2 pieces of muslin at least 16 1/2" square, this is the front. To prevent the layers from shifting spray adhesive on one side of the muslin and place the 2nd layer on top and press. Make sure all the edges match before going to next step. If you use heavier material you do not need to double. It is easier if heavier material is used, I just like the look of the muslin.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 2:
    Cut 4 pieces 16 1/2" wide x 11" tall for the back pieces. Follow the same process for the back pieces. The goal is to end up with a 15.5" pillow cover for your 16" pillow form. You need to make your pillow cover smaller than your actual pillow form.


    Step 3:
    Take to the sewing machine and sew at least 1/4" seam around the entire pillow front. If you use heavier material you can skip this step. Also use spray starch or magic sizing to give more body to your muslin prior to embroidery. If you are using a heavier fabric you should not need the sizing or starch.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 4:
    Once you have the front sewn together you are ready to add the embroidery design. Take your muslin square, fold in half and then fold in half again. You will have a small square. Take a pin or disappearing marker and mark the top folded corner. This is the center of your pillow.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 5:
    Making sure the pin stays in corner carefully open up your muslin and you will have the exact center of your pillow. Mark at this time as this is the center where your embroidery design will be sewn.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 6:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    Your pillow can be hooped the traditional way by hooping both the material and the stabilizer together, but here is another option if you have a problem getting something like this centered in the hoop. Take a large enough piece of cut away stabilizer and hoop it. Mark the top and bottom and sides of the actual hoop itself with a permanent marker. This can be removed at any time with alcohol.


    Step 7:
    Spray the cut a way stabilizer with spray adhesive. Take your un-embroidered pillow and fold in half, finger press, fold in half again, finger press. Open up and now match up the pressed lines with your hoop and gently finger press the pillow to the stabilizer which should be centered in the hoop.


    Step 8:
    Fold back the sides and top of pillow and should look like this. Sometimes no matter how hard you try it will not hoop straight so this option is very good. Just make sure you have used enough spray adhesive on the stabilizer, not the material, and it as tight as you can get it so it does not pucker when sewing the design.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 9:
    Dot in middle marks the center. Once you have your muslin hooped, TRACE, TRACE, TRACE to make sure you are not going to hit your hoop based on the design size.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 10:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    After you have your material in hoop print out a copy of the embroidery design and make sure the center of your crosshair on your embroidery print out matches the mark for the center of your hooped muslin. My muslin was not quite hooped on center, but I had plenty of room to make sure the centers matched and my machine would not hit the hoop. That is another reason I love the Madeira spray adhesive. It does not gunk up my needle and it holds beautifully. I made sure I finger pressed the material good all the way to the edges of the material and stabilizer. Note, the Mr. and Mrs. design you buy WILL NOT HAVE THE LAST NAME OR THE EST ALONG WITH DATE. Font used for Mr. and Mrs. is "Chancery". This is something you need to add on your own. If you have not done this process before do this on a scrap piece of fabric to practice.


    Step 11:
    ADDING THE APPLIQUE: This is where people use two different techniques.

    1) you can cut the appliqué out prior to sewing onto your design or
    2) you can run the placement stitch, lay down the appliqué fabric then sew the 1st tack down stitch, cut as close as you can to the tack down stitch and finish.
     
    The instructions below are going to be for cutting your design out first. I find less error in cutting the appliqué out first as it makes a much nicer finish to the end product. If  your cut out does not match the outline stitch prior to sewing will be a problem. (I did a test sew out of the 2nd technique, which is NOT cutting out the fabric pieces first. Since there is a oval cut out in this design it will be very difficult to use that technique. Make sure you do a practice piece first to make sure that is the process you want to use.) A practice piece is key to a beautiful final appliquéd item. Also the way you prep the material is very important. The product you need is Heat and Bond Lite. There are numerous U Tube videos on how to appliqué. Take the time to view some of those if you have not done this process before. The first thing I do is select the fabric I want to be the appliqué.

    In this case I had a nice brown Batik I wanted to use and then I pressed it nice and smooth before I added the heat and bond lite. The purpose of heat and bond lite is to stabilize the fabric you are using and it has an adhesive backing. When you iron your fabric to your placement stitch it does two things. It holds your fabric in place when sewing (no more puckered appliqué pieces) and after you launder your item it will not pucker. It also reduces the amt the fabric frays when sewing. This really makes a difference on the final product.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 12:
    Next print out the outline file included in the design download. For those of you that have a Scan and Cut I have included 3 SVG files. I always lay my outline file over my design file printout to make sure the scale on each one is correct. You will know right away if your outline is correct size.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 13:
    Carefully cut out the pieces of the outline paper file. This is where you need to stay on the line when cutting out. If your outline is off it is not going to match up properly. The nice thing about cutting out the pieces is you can keep them and when doing the next project this step is already done. I put in a zip lock bag and pin to my design printout for next use.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 14:
    Apply theHeat and Bond Lite to the back of your fabric. Follow mfg instructions for this process.  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 15:
    You can either flip the design to the wrong side and trace the back paper side or use spray adhesive and lay the template on the right side of the fabric to cut out. If you use the spray adhesive do not spray on fabric, but on the paper piece. You can pin to your fabric, then carefully cut out the design. This is the back side. Notice the template was reversed.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 16:
    This is how it looks if you put the template on the front of your prepped fabric.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 17:
    Here is what it looks like when you cut them out. I made sure I layed the fabric cut out pieces on top of the placement line design to make sure everything fits the way that it should. If it does not fit right at this point it will not fit right when you apply to your placement stitch.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 18:
    Your hoop is all prepared and you have traced your design with your machine so you know you will not hit your hoop you are ready to sew the placement stitch. It will look just like the picture in step 16. Once the placement stitch is sewn the machine will stop and you will be ready to add the appliqués. Make sure you remove the paper backing on your Heat and Bond Lite. This is where the small craft iron comes in very handy. I replaced my clover with this one and love it. You need to heat the appliqué enough to melt the glue so it does not shift when the tack down and satin stitch is being laid down.Since I have a commercial machine I carefully took my hoop out my machine, (material still hooped) and laid this on a flat surface to press.You can do this at the machine, but be extremely careful nothing shifts when you do this. If you use the 2nd method you will not iron until you are completely finished with the satin stitching.  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 19:
    Now your machine will be ready to finish sewing the appliqué. The 2nd stitch is the tackdown stitch for those that prefer to cut the appliqué after it is in the hoop. This method will definitely require appliqué scissors and cutting as close to the edge of the stitching as possible. Due to the oval in the center of the & it will be difficult to cut this out. If you do this step be extremely careful you do not cut the background material. The 3rd is the tackdown which is a blanket stitch that will hold the appliqué firmly in place, and the last stitch is the satin stitch for the finished appliqué. I press very well with a regular iron on the wrong side when finished (out of the hoop) and this makes for a very smooth appliqué. For items that will be laundered will not pucker.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)

     


    Step 20:
    To add your custom name you would leave your fabric hooped and sew the name into the middle of the two lines. Mark the middle of the area you are going to add the name, print out the name and match the centers, realign the machine and you are ready to sew. If you do not have enough hoop space for the EST and date you can take your item out of the hoop and rehoop it by following the same method as the beginning of this process. Again, U Tube is your friend. There are a lot of video’s on how to do this.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 21:
    Once those are added you can remove from the hoop and trim the back of the design. This is where the embroidery scissors really come in handy as you can trim close to the design. Take extra caution that you do not cut your fabric. I run my finger or a small item that can lift the stabilizer from the material so I do not cut anything but stabilizer.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 22:
    Press press press the top side of the pillow. I pressed the back side really good along with more spray starch. I did have a little puckering on the dates, but that is due to the double thickness of muslin. I will steam after assembly on the pillow and finger press.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 23:
    Now to start work on the back. I like this back as there is nothing to sew at the bottom. When this is done you are ready to insert form and no hand sewing. This is what the back will look like when finished.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 24:
    Take the 4 cut pieces 16 1/2" wide x 11" tall, which is used for the back and spray adhesive 1 of the 2 pieces and lay the 2nd piece on top. Iron the two pieces together just like the front piece was done. Use spray adhesive on the 2nd piece and finish the same way. On the 16 1/2" width edge fold under 1/4" and press toward the back. Sew 1/4" around sides and bottom of both pieces. This will just keep everything together when sewing to the front. Measure down 1  1/2" and fold that over and press. If you do not double the material you do not need to sew around the material. Your goal is to have the pieces measure 15 ½ inches after seaming is complete. Your cover needs to be ½” smaller in diameter than the pillow.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 25:
    This is how both pieces should look when pressed and folded over. They will be exactly the same.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 26:
    If you want to get real creative use a decorative stitch to sew along the bottom of the folded edge or just use a straight stitch. Press both pieces when done to make sure there are no wrinkles.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 27:
    Now is the time to add the velcro closure. Use any color velcro as you will not see this when shut. Cut 1, 4" strip and pull the velcro apart. Fold 1 of the pieces of muslin in half and mark the center with either a pin or disappearing ink. I love my disappearing ink pen! One of the velcro pieces will be sewn on the top side, like the below and one will be sewn on the wrong side. To make sure you have the correct sides together pin or hold the velcro in place and make sure it closes properly. Take 1 of the pieces to the sewing machine and stitch around the perimeter of the velcro making sure you have a couple back stitches at the beginning and end to hold the velcro securely.   

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 28:
    This picture is marked to show how the velcro should look when sewn onto the muslin. Red square indicates the stitches as the velcro is on the bottom or wrong side of the pillow. One piece of Velcro is closer to the edge of the pillow opening and the other piece of Velcro is further down.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 29:
    After the velcro is sewn in middle then sew each side together at opening edge. The goal is to make sure the finished back is just like the front. If you are slightly bigger that is okay as you can trim extra off after both pieces are sewn together.  
     


    Step 30:
    (Click Image to Enlarge)
    The back is now ready to be sewn to the top piece. Pin front to back with right sides facing and sew around perimeter of pillow. If needed trim around perimeter of the pillow. I leave 1/4" at minimum for the seam after the sewing is complete.


    Step 31:
    Trim diagonal at corners. Turn pillow right side out.

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 32:
    Take corner tool or end of blunt scissors and push out corner without going through.  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 33:
    To make the edges nice I slightly open up and gently press open and then fold and press down. This will get rid of any seam not completely open.  

    (Click Image to Enlarge)



    Step 34:
    After the pillow is pressed you are ready to insert the form. Slip 1/2 the form in and push to the top of the pillow and then lift up the bottom and insert.  


    Step 35:
    Pull the top part of the pillow over and fasten the velcro. You now have a completed pillow. At this time if there are any wrinkles or puckers you can steam the pillow with the form inside. With the extra fullness it makes for getting out the rest of any unnecessary wrinkles or puckers.


    Share this project:     
    Meet The Author: Jayne Monsipapa
    Jayne Monsipapa has been digitizing for 24 years. It all started after walking into a sewing store in 1993 to buy a couple spools of thread and there was a sewing machine hooked up to a computer! Embroidering the designs were fun at first, but it did not take much to get hooked on digitizing. From 1993 until 1999 she worked on her digitizing skills and found her designs sewed out very good. With her husband’s encouragement Kinship Kreations LLC began in 1999 selling designs online. In those early years she took classes with both Walt Floriani and Lee Caroselli (Balboa Embroidery) who are both very talented and successful digitizers. Jayne joined the EmbroideryDesigns team in 2008.

    Feedback
    Rate this Project: Awful Poor Average Good Excellent    Not Yet Rated
    | |
    Shelia E May 01, 2017
    How do I get the scan n cut file? shecandoit58@gmail.com thanks.
    Reply
    Jayne M May 01, 2017
    Shelia, the SVG file is available in the Download.
    Reply
    SHOPPING CART
    Contains 0 Item
    RECEIVE SPECIALS AT...
    Sign Up
    Scroll to Top Image
    New Message Alert
    New Message(s)
    Your custom digitizing order(s) has 1 new message(s) waiting for you. Please read immediately and respond to expedite the processing of your order(s).
    Read Message Now
    CLOSE